Why Employees Don’t Do What They Are Supposed To – book excerpt

Recently, I read an excerpt from an interesting book. Ferdinand Fournies, a former professor at Columbia University, has summarized two decades of interviewing nearly 25,000 managers in his book, Why Employees Don’t Do What They’re Supposed To and What You Can Do About It. Fournies asked managers why they believe employees did not do what was expected of them in their jobs. His list of top reasons includes:

They don’t know why they should do it.
They don’t know how to do it.
They don’t know what they are supposed to do.
They think your way will not work.
They think their way is better.
They think something else is more important.
There is not positive consequence to them for doing it.
They think they are doing it.
They are rewarded for not doing it.
They are punished for doing the things they should be doing.
They anticipate a negative consequence for doing it.
There is no negative consequence to them for poor performance.
Obstacles beyond their control
Their personal limits prevent them from performing.
Personal problems.
No one could do it.

Do any of these sound familiar in your workplace? If so, why do they happen and what can you do about it? Fournies has some ideas in his book, and we’ve got some as well. I’ll share them in my next blog. Just to give you a hint – they involve engaging your employees.

Advertisements

About CALMC Blog

Columbus Area Labor-Management Committee is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to involving employers and employees to preserve jobs, resolve workplace issues, and promote labor-management cooperation. Visit our website at http://calmc.org
This entry was posted in Employee Engagement, Employee Involvement and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to Why Employees Don’t Do What They Are Supposed To – book excerpt

  1. Pingback: Why Employees Don’t Do What They Are Supposed To – Part 2: What We Can Do About It | calmcblog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.